Mashpee High School Offers First-Ever Native American Language Course

Mashpee High School Offers First-Ever Native American Language Course

Learning a new language has long been a requirement at most American high schools. While the typical offerings include Spanish, French, and Latin, in Mashpee, a small group of students is taking on a language that hasn’t been spoken fluently in centuries. WCAI’s Kathryn Eident has more on the Wôpanâak Language class at Mashpee High School.

Reclaiming a lost language; New school’s goal to teach children Wampanoag tribe’s native tongue

Reclaiming a lost language; New school’s goal to teach children Wampanoag tribe’s native tongue

Students of the Mukayuhsak Weekuw language nest, or the ″Children’s House,” could be the first to grow up with a proficiency in Wôpanâak, the long-lost language of the Wampanoag nation.

And if the toddlers — some as young as 3 years old — decide to attend high school in Mashpee, they may be able to take classes about their native tongue for credit.

Wampanoags teaching children their lost language

Wampanoags teaching children their lost language

The Massachusetts tribe whose ancestors shared a Thanksgiving meal with the Pilgrims nearly 400 years ago is reclaiming its long-lost language, one schoolchild at a time.

‘‘Weesowee mahkusunash,’’ said teacher Siobhan Brown, using the Wampanoag phrase for ‘‘yellow shoes’’ as she reads to a preschool class from Sandra Boynton’s popular children’s book ‘‘Blue Hat, Green Hat.’’